Outsourcing Your Software Testing: When Does it Make Sense

One of the biggest challenges facing any organization that produces software is testing it. Using in-house testing methods may lead to a number of issues. Insiders often have a particular feel for how a program works, and this can lead to them miss problems. Also, many organizations simply don’t have the experience dealing with testing as a specific trade. It’s not usual, therefore, for operations to outsource their software testing efforts. Here are a few key ideas to keep in mind as you face that choice.

Automation vs Manual Testing

Some tasks in testing are simply too hard for a human user to truly duplicate at a scale large enough to produce meaningful data. For example, companies trying to test the functionality of APIs will have a difficult time hitting servers with enough requests to simulate the load that millions of real-world users will produce in employing a fully deployed version of the software. This is a case where automation of testing efforts might prove to be highly advantageous. Similar cases often emerge when a company needs to test the scalability and endurance of software, and automation is also a common choice for testing how well spikes are handled.

Conversely, automated systems often struggle to fully reproduce usage behaviour. User interface issues are especially hard to detect by any means other than real-world use by actual humans. In instances where the user interaction with the software is more important, it may be wise to look toward a manual testing solution.

For companies using automated models, many are turning to Agile processes. This approach allows them to focus on providing support in shorter sprints. In environments where frequent releases are anticipated, an Agile model using functional and regression testing helps to see that nothing is broken. This also limits the leak of issues into production models, since the process has multiple redundancies built in.

In-House vs Outsourced

There is often a strong temptation to test software solely in-house. In the early phases of a project, this can produce cost savings. It also has the potential to speed projects up, but this swiftness may be paid for later if in-house testers aren’t able to identify potential problems early on. Unless an organization has the resources required to effectively build its own independent, in-house testing division, there are huge possible downsides to handling the task that way.

Outsourced solutions for testing are common. Not only do outsourcing firms bring greater independence to the process, they also are capable of a level of specialization that may actually speed projects up. For companies overhauling legacy products, outsourcing options are often very helpful, as they often have competencies in the use of older systems and programming languages.

On-Shore vs Off-Shore vs Hybrid

The question of outsourcing software testing also leads to questions about exactly how close to home the testing provider needs to be. On-shore firms tend to be much less cost-effective upfront, but they often carry with them some added advantages. Foremost, employees of on-shore firms are more likely to be native speakers of your company’s language. They also are more likely to work in a time zone close to yours, and that can make scheduling of conferences and consultations simpler.

Off-shore firms tend to bring one specific advantage to the table: price. Work that might cost hundreds of thousands of dollars to perform in the U.S. may cost less than $10,000 to do overseas. That said, many off-shore companies can deliver surprisingly impressive results for the price. If you’re comfortable handling conferencing in a flexible manner, off-shoring often can yield major savings.

This is another case where companies often pursue a hybrid approach. Working with a consulting firm to determine what tasks are better to do on- or off-shore may also be beneficial.

Determining Qualifications and Expertise

The most widely recognized governing body in the industry that grants qualifications is the International Software Testing Qualifications Board. The ISTQB offers two tier, certifying engineers who have beginner-level experience of less than 5 years and those who have more. In many instances, it may be simpler to look at technical qualifications, like programming and administrative certifications from Microsoft and Oracle, to establish competency.

It’s wise, however, to not overrate the value of qualifications when dealing with software testing. When possible, you should ask services providers to supply case studies and references.

Conclusion

Software testing, especially once an organization has expanded to the point that it expects a large user base, is important to perform. The question that each company faces is how to divvy up the workload. Some tasks are ideally suited to automation, while others are best handled manually. Likewise, it may make more sense to employ an outsourced firm or even an off-shore company to deal with these aspects of the job. With a little forethought, you can see that your software will be tested thoroughly and without breaking your project budget.

 

If you have questions about outsourcing or are interested in outsourcing your software testing activities, give us a call. We’re always happy to answer any questions.


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